Awanouta. Part 1. Song of Creation


Awanouta in box

Part 1.  Awanouta, Song of Creation

Awanouta (Awa no Uta) is a powerful song. See it in the box above. All figures provided by S. Sakata. It is comprised of all 48 of the creation kami as taught by the great sage, Toyoke-sama. Toyoke-sama designed the Motoake chart to teach the creation of Universe by Amemiwoya, Great Origin, and the 48 kami. The Wosite syllabary itself is powerful since it contains all 48 of the kami. Indeed, one can say that the Wosite language is powerful. Wosite contains the power of sound, the power of human voice.

Isanagi and Isanami, and the Motoake

The Awanouta was composed by Isanagi and Isanami, the futakami (two kami, the kami pair) who served as the 7th Amakami in Wosite era. When they first came to live in the capital, there was something they noticed. Although the two of them spoke proper Japanese, the people of the land found it difficult to understand each other because of their strong regional dialects. The two Amakami thought that it is important to clear the speech of the people to proper language. They would base the teaching on Motoake. When people sang the Awanouta, their speech would become beautiful and they would naturally acquire a unified sense of being Japanese. Further, the Awanouta contains the hidden laws and history of Universe. Creative energy works through sound, and sound energy establishes the message of Awanouta in people’s mind and body.

Verse 111  Akahanama and Awanouta

The Awanouta is given in lines 111 – 114 of Hotuma Tutae. It  goes like this:

a ka ha na ma     i ki hi ni mi u ku

hu nu mu e ke     he ne me o ko ho no

mo to ro so yo     wo te re se ye tu ru

su yu wu ti ri     si yi ta ra sa ya wa

The song begins with  a  and ends with  wa. As we know,  a  represents Cosmos, and  wa  represents earth. The song contains hidden energy of the creation of Universe. It applies to the birth of a baby as well as of a kuni, country/land/area.

The figure above shows the Awanouta in the box. Isanagi sings the first two columns and Isanami sings the next two columns. Note the eight ideograms shown in green. They are: a, i, hu, he, mo, wo, su, si. Did you realize that they are the eight Anami-kami in the Motoake chart? They were discussed in a previous post, Hutomani Part 1. These eight appear in the second ring (pink) of eight kami in the Motoake chart.

Motoake En.

Verse 654 Kuniume to and the law of 5 and 7

Verse 654 on the left side of the first figure reads:

kuni ume to     tami no kotoha no

hutu kumori     kore naosan to

kankayete     yine nana miti no

awa uta o     kami husoyo koye

isanagi to     simo husoyo koye

isanami to     utai turanete

Observe that there are three colors of ideograms in the poem:  Green indicates the phrase, yine nana miti. In blue, kami husoyo koye isanagi. In red:  simo husoyo koye isanami. We will explain them shortly.

Glossary:

kuni ume (umi) / birth of a country.  tami / people.  kotoha / language, speech.  hutu / very.  kumori / dim.  naosu / to fix.  kankayete / thinking.  yi ne / 5 root.  nana (ne) / 7 (root).   

miti / law (in this case).  kami / upper or first (in this case).  simo / lower or second (in this case).

hu-so-yo / 20 plus 4, or 24.  utai / sing.  turane / to continue.

Interpretation

The birth of the country     the speech of the people

was very dim.     To fix this

they thought of     law of 5 and 7 roots.

Awa Uta      upper 24 sung

by Isanagi;     lower 24 sung

by Isanami     who continued the song.

Isanagi and Isanami give birth to the country.

This verse is telling the story of the time when the speech of the diverse people was “dim”, that is, not clear, and they had difficulty communicating with each other due to their distinct dialects. Isanagi and Isanami thought of a remedy. Based on the intonation of the language, they felt that they would focus on a backbone of five and seven syllables (yine nana miti, the green ideograms in the poem). Five and seven are the base of syllables and grammar, the unique rhythm and intonation of the Japanese language. They composed a song of 48 syllables, and Isanagi sang the first half (kami husoyo koye isanagi, it says in blue) and Isanami sang the second half (simo husoyo koye isanami, in red). The reason they are called the kami upper and the simo lower will soon become clear in Part 2.

To protect the pronunciation, rhythm, and syllables of the five and seven, the eight Anami-Kami were placed at the beginning of each phrase in the Uta. These are shown as the green ideograms in the Awanouta.

From the age of Woshite to the present day, for more than three thousand years, the rhythm of five and seven is in the Japanese poetry, language and mind. Haiku and tanka poems employ 5 and 7 syllables.

***

Advertisements