Climate of Kunitokotati’s Time

Temperature over the last 13,000 years, by Yasuda Yoshinori.

This is a continuation of Julian Way’s post about Kunitokotati (Kunitokotachi)

The climate of the Japanese archipelago 15,000 BCE switched from continental type to oceanic type. In the archipelago, centered at 40 degrees north latitude with lots of snow, buna (beech) and oak type deciduous broad-leaved forests expanded. In the midst of the forests of the temperate zone, the oldest doki earthenware of the initial Jomon culture began. Excavation at Fukui-ken Torihama kaizuka 鳥浜貝塚 showed that Jomon resided there 14,500 years ago. 


13,500 years ago, 7,000 people came from Baikal due to climate change on the continent. This map shows Lake Baikal in the upper left corner. The arrow indicates the movement of those Altaic people to East Asia and northern Japan. Hokkaido was still connected to the continent. They migrated to East Nihon where there were only 1500 people, so that 4 out of 5 people were from Baikal. 

Those who solved the difficulty of changing climate and population were those who were later called “Kunitokotachi.” The time was ten thousand years ago. It corresponds to the end of the early Jomon period.

In the days of Toyoke, Isanagi, and Amateru-kimi, around 3,000 years ago, it was getting colder and colder. See chart above by Yasuda Yoshinori, author of Rice-Cultivation Fishing Culture. Note the temperature rise 10,000 years ago, and the warm temperatures between 6,000 to 5,000 years ago, and the cool climate of 3,000 to 2,000 years ago.

The chart below covers a period of 18,000 years. Although the ice age was ending, there was a cooling period called the Younger-Dryas around 11,000 years ago. The warm period is called the Holocene maximum.


Image and quote credit here.

Warming began about 15,000 years ago, interrupted about 4,000 years later by the Younger Dryas, a time when colder conditions returned for about 1,000 years. 10,000 years ago another period of abrupt warming began bringing climate into the present interglacial.




Kunitokotati and To-no-Wosite


Who was Kunitokotati? Kunitokotati is considered the founder of the land. He is the first identified person in the Amakami family tree. His eight sons, called the Kunisatsuchi, spread civilization throughout the islands.

What kind of person was the first Amakami Kunitokotati (Kunitokotachi)? Julian Way’s blog reveals much about him.

Kunitokotati.  Kunitokotati’s character emerges out of the Wosite literature. He sensitively observed and studied everything. He was clearly a creative person who excelled in all things. Moreover, he was a leader that people depended on. He was completely selfless. He generously taught skills to people. He rejoiced at the happiness of others as his own. Furthermore, he was a great person who had the power to see the future.

All was not so simple, though. There were climate changes and immigration from the Continent. See the next post. But Kunitokotati-sama dealt with these problems. Kunitokotati’s era was around 10,000 years ago, long before the time the Wosite Documents were written. Time flowed and flowed until it was around 4,000 years ago. The climate that had been stable suddenly changed.

Toyoke-kami.  Then, from the time when Toyoke-kami was young, society started going downhill. There was a decline in agricultural production, a rise in the difference between rich and poor. People were behaving  badly. Toyoke-sama wanted to correct the situation, to create a new, bright, kuni of peace based on ideals. It was imperative to retrieve what was needed, to look back at the transmission from the past, and to deeply consider and question the foundation of the kuni. 

That foundation is To-no-Wosite.

Also called To-no-Wosiye.

To-no-Wosite.  In Wosite, the character  TO  (see above image) is written with the square of hani and the glyph of two arms spreading open to the sky. The character represents someone who receives the blessings of Nature and shares them freely with others. People shared the blessings they received and were grateful. They understood that each person’s happiness is connected with that of others. Expressed as To-no-Wosiye, this is the Teaching of To.

Kunitokotati-kami built a nation on the foundation of To-no-Wosite, and so did Toyoke-kami and the Hutakami Isanami and Isanagi.





Jomon Population and Language: Notes from Ruins of Identity


Jomon Population

According to Mark J. Hudson, in Ruins of Identity, University of Hawaii Press, 1999, the Japanese islands were settled by populations from Southeast Asia and/or South China during the Pleistocene (epoch before the Holocene). They were the ancestors of the Jomon who occupied the islands from the beginning of the Holocene (approximately 11,500 years before present) until the end of the Jomon period. The Yayoi period began in 300 BCE. with the influx of Northeast Asian people who spread through the islands from Kyushu to Tohoku during the next six hundred years until the Kofun period began in 300 CE.

Jomon Language

There was a single parent Jomon language, Proto-Japanese, which existed before the texts of the 8th century (Kojiki and Nihon Shoki) . Hudson reserves the term Japanese to refer to the population beginning in the Yayoi period that was the admixture of the indigenous Jomon with the Continental immigrants.

He points out that “the most noticeable things… is the comparative lack of linguistic variation in Ainu, Japanese, and Ryukyuan. Many Japanese linguists assume that Japanese has a long history stretching back into the Jomon period for 10,000 years or more, e.g., Sakiyama 1969, 169.” This quote is from Hudson, p 92, and the italics are Hudson’s.

The Northern Kyushu dialect should be the oldest, based on the movement of the immigrating people. However, there is the lack of variations as mentioned above. There is a “relative uniformity of dialects,” p 96, considering the 10,000 years of history.

Commentary by WositeWorld 

WoshiteWorld has been providing information about the Wosite language of the Jomon period. Wosite corresponds to Hudson’s “Proto-Japanese.” Hudson has emphasized the uniformity of dialects through the Japanese islands. That phenomenon may be due, whether in part or in large measure, to the efforts of the Hutakami who unified the Wosite language and the population as they created the kuni called Yamato. See Awanouta and other posts about kuni-umi.  





Fuyu itaru hi — Winter Solstice Day in Wosite

Reading the Hotuma Tutaye (Hotsuma Tsutae), we find some familiar words. In Aya 28 is the word koyomi, calendar. The Tutaye says that the Takamimusuhi (Takamimusubi) in Hitakami (Tohoku) were given the task of developing a calendar for all the land. First, we note that koyomi is a word from long ago which is still used today. Secondly, this shows that there was a calendar even in those days. And thirdly, that the calendar was developed in Hitakami by the Takamimusuhi, of which Toyoke-kami was the fifth.
A great observance to honor Amakami ancestors was held in fuyu, winter. The current word for winter comes to us from Wosite times!
Aya 27 tells us that the observance was held on fuyu itaru hi, winter solstice day. The current word itaru is written  至る and its meaning is ‘arrival.’ So, winter solstice day is winter arrival day.
Winter has arrived!
 The Kanayama Megaliths, shown here in the snow, have been operating a solar calendar since Wosite times, for at least 5,000 years.
Photo of Kanayama Megaliths by S. Tokuda

Happy New Year!


View toward winter solstice sunrise from Asadori Myoujin (photo by Iwakage)

We at WoshiteWorld send our best wishes for the New Year beginning on winter solstice day, December 21-22. We do realize that it is summer solstice for you readers who live in the Southern Hemisphere. Here, north of the equator, since indigenous times, the December winter solstice marked the beginning of the new year.

The people of the Wosite era had a calendar, and it is described in the documents. Also, from the research done at the Kanayama Megaliths in Gifu Prefecture, we know that for more than five thousand years, the Jomon people observed the sun’s path in the sky and made a highly accurate calendar. The precise dates of the winter and summer solstices are difficult to determine by observations, but these ancient people accomplished this difficult task.

Here are two posts about the solstice by Okunomichi, and by Iwakage. There is also a winter solstice festival at Asadori Myoujin, which stems from prehistoric Jomon Japan. Perhaps the people of Wosite participated in it. The winter solstice is described in Wosite documents as the beginning of a new year and a time of renewal.

To our readers, best wishes for a happy new year!





Ancient Wosite and Modern Astronomy Proclaim:  There is Water on Moon!


Earth seen from Moon,  Apollo 8 image by NASA

Tuki no Mitu   Water of the Moon

There is an eye-catching phrase in the Hotsuma Tsutae: Tuki no Mitu, Water of the Moon. Tuti means moon, and mitu means water. See the large Wosite characters for mitu. The phrase is the first column of the verse. 


The passage consists of lines 2610-2613 in Hotsuma Tsutae. The verse reads:

tuki no mitu     kutaseru tuyu ha     kawa no mitu     utuho ukure ha     kumo to nari     ti-ayumi nohoru     hani no iki

This is a description of the water cycle where water comes down as dew and rain into rivers which then evaporate to form clouds and the cycle repeats.

August 30, 2017

This passage made us wonder if tuki no mitu,  water of the moon, really meant that there is water on the moon. If the people of the Wosite World are correct, isn’t it amazing that they knew this before we moderns did?

News confirming this came out recently. Previous reports as early as 2009 indicated that there might be water present on the moon. Excerpts from three news articles dated 2017, 2013, and 2009 are given below.

News report August 2, 2017

A new study of satellite data suggests that the moon’s interior is surprisingly water-rich.

The research, published July 24, 2017 in Nature Geoscience, finds that numerous volcanic deposits across the surface of the moon contain unusually high amounts of trapped water.

The researchers found evidence of water in nearly all of the large pyroclastic deposits – that is, deposits of rock fragments erupted by a volcano – that had been previously mapped across the moon’s surface, including deposits near the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites where the water-bearing glass bead samples were collected.

The idea that the interior of the moon is water-rich raises interesting questions about the moon’s formation, say the researchers. For example, scientists think the moon formed from debris left behind after an object about the size of Mars slammed into the Earth very early in solar system history. One of the reasons scientists had assumed the moon’s interior should be dry is that it seems unlikely that any of the hydrogen needed to form water could have survived the heat of that impact.

Shuai Li is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii and co-author of the study. Li said:

The growing evidence for water inside the moon suggest that water did somehow survive, or that it was brought in shortly after the impact by asteroids or comets before the moon had completely solidified. The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question.

Previous News Articles

May 9, 2013

Water inside the moon’s mantle came from primitive meteorites, new research finds, the same source thought to have supplied most of the water on Earth.

The findings raise new questions about the process that formed the moon.

The moon is thought to have formed from a disc of debris left when a giant object hit the Earth 4.5 billion years ago, very early in Earth’s history. Scientists have long assumed that the heat from an impact of that size would cause hydrogen and other volatile elements to boil off into space, meaning the moon must have started off completely dry. But recently, NASA spacecraft and new research on samples from the Apollo missions have shown that the moon actually has water, both on its surface and beneath.

By showing that water on the moon and on Earth came from the same source, this new study offers yet more evidence that the moon’s water has been there all along.

November 13, 2009

‘Significant Amount’ of Water Found on Moon, By Andrea Thompson

It’s official: There’s water ice on the moon, and lots of it. When melted, the water could potentially be used to drink or to extract hydrogen for rocket fuel.

NASA’s LCROSS probe discovered beds of water ice at the lunar south pole when it impacted the moon last month, mission scientists announced today. The findings confirm suspicions announced previously, and in a big way.




Iwate Shrines of Seoritsuhime

DSC03537 Mt Iwate C

Seoritsuhime is the guardian spirit of rapids, rivers, and purification. She was also an accomplished woman of the Wosite World. Yamanomiya has posted a series of reports on Seoritsuhime shrines in Tono and Hanamaki, Iwate. The series begins with the post, Iwate Shrines of Seoritsuhime .

This post begins a series on eight shrines of Seoritsuhime in Iwate prefecture. At the core is a group of five related shrines in Tōno. They are as well connected geometrically, Genbu claims. There is a legend in Tōno about three sister megami (female kami). Three of the shrines represent the sisters, the fourth the mother. All are shrines of Seoritsuhime.

The sites visited include:

  • Kitakami River source: Yuhazu no Izumi at Mido Kannon, Iwate town
  • Sakuramatsu Jinja and Fudo Taki, Hachimantai
  • Ishigami Jinja, Tōno
  • Kamiwakare Jinja, Tōno
  • Hayachine Jinja, Tōno
  • Rokko-ushi Jinja, Tōno
  • Izu Jinja, Tōno
  • Tsuzuki Ishi, Connected Rocks, Tōno
  • Hayachine Jinja, Hanamaki